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To anyone unfamiliar with the world of allergies, there is no clear connection between allergies and asthma. However, there is a strong and trusted connection between the two. Depending on your point of view, this could be either a good or a bad thing. Regardless of how you look at it, allergy testing can help asthma sufferers enjoy some long-term relief from chronic asthma symptoms.

The relationship between allergies and asthma

Firstly, it’s important to understand what, exactly the connection is between the two. In most cases, an allergy can cause asthma to form. If someone is allergic to dust, for instance, their body sees the dust particles that enter your body as something to destroy at all costs. Amongst rashes or other reactions, it can also cause lung issues such as coughing and wheezing. This is all in an effort to clear your body of this perceived “dangerous” threatening allergen.

The term for the formation of asthmatic symptoms related to allergies is “allergic asthma”. What this means is that allergic asthma triggers the onset of asthma. Asthma attacks could be present with the allergen of after the fact.

Can allergy testing help my asthma?

If you are someone who is living with asthma, you may find that allergy testing can help with asthma. With proper identification (and avoidance) of the allergen, your asthmatic symptoms may improve or even disappear entirely. Since your body is no longer fighting off the allergen, the symptoms will no longer be an issue.

While allergies and asthma are treated differently, there is information that suggests that treating one will help with the other. Allergic asthma occurs because the body is fighting off the allergen, and the lungs and airways will suffer to the point of triggering the asthmatic symptoms. When you remove and avoid the allergen, the lungs and related symptoms no longer will be triggered the same way.

Treating an allergy is not necessarily a cure for asthma, as asthma can be triggered by issues other than an allergy (sometimes asthmatics don’t even have allergies). But, there is research that suggests that treating one can help improve to alleviate the other while improving the overall quality of life on both sides.

Asthma and allergies don’t always go together

Some people will experience allergic asthma, but it isn’t necessarily guaranteed. More often than not, it’s rashes or runny eyes when it comes to mild and moderate allergies. Anyone with a history of allergic asthma or who experienced hay fever as a child is more likely to deal with asthmatic reactions later in life that could be triggered by what otherwise should be a classic allergic reaction.

Neither asthma or allergies are fun health issues to deal with — then again, what is fun to deal with when it comes to health? — But understanding the connection between them and being ready to deal with any symptoms or causes can help you make the most out of a not-so-great situation. This is great news for those who deal with asthma attacks on a regular basis.